mercredi 7 janvier 2009

Les Saigneurs d'Amérique du Nord

D'après cet ouvrage, ce sont les Bronfman qui auraient convaincu le Canada de voter pour la fondation d'Israël.

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/29/21/bb58810ae7a031b025c7a110._AA240_.L.jpg


SamBronfman,JohnMcCloy



Ownership of Canadian Newspapers


How did this come to pass, with all the government commissions to investigate media concentration in Canada? The commissions came and went, but the media ownership got more and more concentrated.
The effect is a dumbing-down of the national media, with the American Zionist neoconservative rubrick of the War on Terror completely adopted by the media Canadians trusted to keep them informed.
This is from McGill University http://www.mcgill.ca/files/misc/NewsOwnership.pdf

Ownership of Canadian Newspapers

Version 1, August 2005
Ownership of Canadian Newspapers is an ongoing study tracing the changes in
ownership of Canadian newspapers. Data were collected in conjunction with the OMPP
Ottawa Press Gallery Study. Initial information on ownership was gathered mainly from
the report of the Royal Commission on Newspapers (Canada, 1981), from newspapers
articles reporting on the different mergers and acquisitions, from the official websites of
the different newspapers or from the newspapers’ own archives.
This list is far from being complete. We therefore welcome any additions to our ongoing
study. If you have further information on the ownership of these Canadian newspapers,
please send them to the OMPP at ompp@mcgill.ca.
Citation: Maialène Boutin-Wilkins. 2005. Ownership of Canadian Newspapers.
Observatory on Media and Public Policy, McGill University,
http://www.ompp.mcgill.ca.

National


Globe and Mail

1844-1880: George Brown (named The Globe)
1844-1853: weekly newspaper
1880-1888: syndicate whose members included Senator Robert Jaffray
1888-1936: Jaffray family
1936-1952: George McCullagh (renamed The Globe and Mail) (The Mail had been
established by Conservative backers in 1872, and had merged with another Conservative
paper, The Empire, in 1895.)
1952-1965: R. Howard Webster (Montreal financier)
1965-1980: FP Publications Ltd. of Toronto
1980-2001: Thomson Newspapers
2001- : Bell Globemedia

National Post
1998-2001: Hollinger
2001- : CanWest Global (CanWest had acquired 50% of the National Post in 2000, it
acquired the other half in 2001)

British Columbia

Vancouver Province
*Incomplete
1898: founded
1927-2000: Southam
1957: partnership with Vancouver Sun: Pacific Newspaper Groups Inc. (split production
costs between the two newspapers)
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Vancouver Sun
*Incomplete
1912: founded
1915: Robert J. Cromie buys the newspaper. At his death in 1936, he leaves the
newspaper to his son.
1957: partnership with The Province: Pacific Newspaper Groups Inc. (split production
costs between the two newspapers)
1963: FP Publications buys the majority of the shares
1980: Thomson buys FP Publications
1980: Thomson sells Vancouver Sun to Southam
1980-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Victoria Times-Colonist (Victoria Times and Victoria Colonist merged in 1980)
*Incomplete
1858: Victoria Colonist founded (British Colonist)
1884: Victoria Times founded (Victoria Daily Times)
1953-1980: FP Publications
1980-1998:Thomson Newspapers
1998-2000: Hollinger
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Vancouver Times
No information
Vancouver News Herald
*Incomplete
1933: founded as a co-operative by several journalists
1951: bought by the Vancouver Sun
1952: bought by Thomson Newspapers
1957: closed by Thomson Newspapers

Alberta

Calgary Herald
1883-: Andrew Armour and Thomas Braden (started as a weekly; was named Calgary
Herald, Mining and Ranche Advocate and General Advertiser)
1883-1908: ownership changed a few times
1908-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Calgary Albertan
*Incomplete
1943: George Melrose Bell, Max Bell’s father owns the newspaper
1943: At the death of his father, Max Bell gets a loan and acquires the newspaper
1943-1953: Max Bell
1953-1980: FP Publications
1980: bought by Toronto Sun Publishing Corporation who closed it and launched the
Calgary Sun
Calgary Sun
1980-1996: founded Toronto Sun Publishing Corporation
1994: Rogers Communication buys MacLean Hunter which owned Sun Publishing
1996- : Sun Media Corporation is formed
1999-: Sun Media Corporation is bought by Québécor

Edmonton Sun
1978-1996: founded by Toronto Sun Publishing Corporation
1994: Rogers Communication buys MacLean Hunter which owned Sun Publishing
1996- : Sun Media Corporation is formed
1999-: Sun Media Corporation is bought by Québécor
Edmonton Journal
1903: founded par John Macpherson, John W. Cunningham and Arthur Moore (was
named The Evening Journal)
1909-1912: J.H. Woods (J.P. McConnell, who had options on the paper, sells it to J.H.
Woods)
1912-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Lethbridge Herald
1905: founded by F.E. Simpson & A.S. Bennett
1905-1955: Asbury Buchanan
1955-1980: FP Publications
1980-2000: Thomson Newspapers
2000-: Horizons Operations B.C. Ltd.


Saskatchewan

Regina Leader Post
Incomplete
1883-: founded
1928-1953: Sifton family
1953-1995 : Clifford Sifton and eventually his son Michael
1996-2000: Hollinger
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Saskatoon Star Phoenix
1902: The Phoenix (weekly), founded by Wesley and Leonard Norman
1902-1907: changed ownership a few times
1907-1909: Daily Phoenix, published 3 times a week
1909-1910: became a daily in 1909; changed name in 1910: Saskatoon Capital
1910-1912: W. F. Herman and Talmage Lawson; changed name to Saskatoon Daily Star
1912-1928: changed ownership a few times
1928-1953: Sifton family: bought two dailies: Saskatoon Daily Star and The Daily
Phoenix and founded the Saskatoon Star Phoenix
1953-1995: Clifford Sifton and eventually his son Michael Sifton
1996-2000: Hollinger
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Manitoba

Winnipeg Free Press
1872: founded by W.F. Luxton (Manitoba Free Press; becomes the Winnipeg Free Press
in 1931)
1898: bought by Clifford Sifton and Clifford Jr.)
1953- : Victor Sifton
1953-1980: FP Publications (Victor Sifton, Max Bell and Richard S. Malone)
1980-2001: Thomson Newspapers
2001-: FP Canadian Newspapers Limited Partnership

Winnipeg Tribune
*Incomplete
1886: founded by John J. Moncrieff (?)
1920: bought by Southam
1980: closed by Southam on August 27, 1980. The Ottawa Journal was closed on the
previous day by Thomson Newspapers.
Winnipeg Sun
1980: co-founded by Frank Goldberg and launched in November, shortly after the
Winnipeg Tribune was closed by Southam. Many Tribune employees went to work at the
Sun. It was originally published three times a week.
1983: Québécor acquires 60% of the Winnipeg Sun
1999-: part of Sun Media Corporation which is owned by Québécor

Ontario

Toronto Star
*Incomplete
1892: founded
1913: Joseph E. Atkinson: had the Toronto Star Weekly (founded in 1910; published on
Sundays; renamed Star Weekly in 1938; taken over by Canadian Magazine in 1968-
closed in 1973)
1948-1976: Atkinson Charitable Foundation, in 1958, sold to the trustees
1976- Torstar, holding is created
Toronto Telegram
1876-1948 (originally the Evening Telegram,) was launched in 1876 by John Ross
Robertson. Robertson dies at some point, owned by a trust he had established
1948-1952: George McCullagh
1952-1971: John Bassett
1971-: Bassett closed down the Telegram; some journalists start the Toronto Sun

Toronto Sun
1971: founded by Toronto Sun Publishing Corporation
1982: MacLean Hunter buys half of Sun
1994: Rogers Communication buys MacLean Hunter
1996: Rogers sells 62.5% share in Sun Publishing
1996: Sun Media Corporation is formed
1999-: Sun Media Corporation is bought by Québécor

Ottawa Journal
*Incomplete
1959-1980: FP Publications
1980: bought by Thomson Newspapers
1980: closed by Thomson Newspapers

Ottawa Sun
1988-1996: founded by Toronto Sun Publishing Corporation
1994: Rogers Communication buys MacLean Hunter which owned Sun Publishing
1996- : Sun Media Corporation is formed
1999-: Sun Media Corporation is bought by Québécor

Ottawa Citizen
1845-1846: founded by William Harris (named Bytown Packet, renamed The Citizen in
1851)
1846-1849: John Bell and Henry Friel
1849-1877: John Bell
1877-1879: Charles Herbert MacIntosh
1879-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Ottawa Today
No information

London Free Press
1949: founded
1952-1997: Blackburn family
1997-1999: Sun Media Corporation
1999-: Sun Media Corporation is bought by Québécor

London News Chronicle
No information

London Daily Express
No information

Sudbury Star
1909-1910: founded by George J. Ashworth (named The Daily Northern Star)
1910-1948: W.E. Mason Equipment (run by Bill Mason)
1948-1950: W.E. Mason Estate (after Bill Mason’s death in 1948)
1950-1955: J.R. Meakes
1955-2001: Thomson Newspapers
2001-: bought by Osprey Media

Windsor Star
1918-1971: Herman family bought The Windsor Record (then renamed Border Cities
Star; renamed The Windsor Daily Star in 1935; renamed Windsor Star in 1959)
1971-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers

Kingston Whig Standard
1849: founded (British Whig)
1925: Rupert Davies bought the British Whig
1926: Davies merged the British Whig and the Kingston Standard merged: Kingston
Whig Standard
1939: Rupert Davies becomes the sole owner of the paper
1939-1990: Davies family (Senator Rupert Davies and sons, Robertson Davies and
Arthur Davies (editor 1951-1969); grandson Michael Davies (editor 1969-1990)
1990-2001: Southam/Hollinger (sold on Oct 26 1990)
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2001-: Osprey buys the newspaper from Hollinger

Hamilton Spectator
1846: founded by Robert Smiley and a partner, it was originally named The Hamilton
Spectator and Journal of Commerce
1877-1998: Southam
1998: Hollinger
1998: Sun Media Corporation
1999: Québécor acquires Sun Media Corporation
1999-: bought by Torstar Corporation

St. Catharines’ Standard
1891-1996: founded by the Burgoyne family
1996-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000: CanWest Global buys the Hollinger/Southam newspapers
2003-: Osprey buys the newspaper from CanWest Global

Quebec

Le Droit
1913-1983 (March 27th 1913) Onésime Guibord, Pierre Esdras Terrien, Aurélien
Bélanger, Charles-Siméon-Omer Boudreault, Samuel Genest et Charles Charlebois :
Syndicat d’Oeuvres sociales (pères oblats)
1983-1987: Unimédia (groupe Unimédia in 1987)
1987-2000: Hollinger
2000-: Gesca (owned by Power Corporation)

Le Devoir
1910: founded by Henri Bourassa
independent

La Presse
1884: founded by William-Edmond Blumhart
1889-1904: Trefflé Berthiaume
1904-1906: David Russel
1906-1955: famille Berthiaume-Du Tremblay
1955-: bought by Paul Desmarais (Power Corporation)
Owned by Gesca (Power Corporation)

Le Journal de Montreal
1964: founded by Pierre Péladeau (Québécor)
1999-: part of Sun Media Corporation which is owned by Québécor
Le Soleil
*Incomplete
1896: (December, 28) founded L’Électeur
50s-60s-1973: Gilbert family
1973-1987: Groupe Unimédia
1987-2000: Hollinger
2000-: Gesca (Power Corporation)

Montreal Gazette
*Incomplete
1776: founded by Fleury Mesplet
1907-1968: The Gazette Printing Company
1968-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1992: Hollinger acquires 22.6% of Southam
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-: CanWest Global buys Hollinger’s newspapers

Montréal Matin
*Incomplete
1978 : closed by its owner, Gesca (owned by Power Corporation). The last edition was
published on December 27.

Montreal Star
*Incomplete
1979 : closed by its owner, FP Publications

Le Petit Journal
*Incomplete
Weekly paper, published from 1926 until 1978

La Patrie
*Incomplete
Daily, and later on a weekly paper published from 1879 until 1978

Le Canada
No information

Le Nouveau Journal
No information

L’Action Catholique
*Incomplete
1973 : closed
Montreal Daily News
1988: acquired by Québécor.
1989: closed


New Brunswick

New Brunswick Telegraph Journal
No information
L’Évangéline
No information

Daily Telegraph
No information

Saint John Times Globe
No information

Nova Scotia

Cape Breton Post (Sydney)
*Incomplete
1901-1971: independent publication
1971-1996: Thomson Newspapers
1996-2000: Southam/Hollinger
1996: Hollinger owns 50% of Southam
1997: Hollinger owns 58% of Southam
1999: Hollinger owns Southam
2000-2002: CanWest Global buys Hollinger’s newspapers
2002-: GTC Transcontinental

The Daily News (Halifax)
1974: David and Diana Bentley and Patrick and Joyce Simms founded The Great Eastern
News Company Ltd. to publish the weekly broadsheet The Bedford-Sackville News.
1979: began publishing as a daily and with the name Daily News
1985: Newfoundland Capital Corporation acquired a controlling interest
1987: Newfoundland Capital Corporation gains complete ownership
1997-2000 : Hollinger
2000-2002: CanWest Global buys the Southam/Hollinger newspapers
2002-: GTC Transcontinental buys the newspaper
Sydney Post Record
No information

Halifax Mail Star
No information

Halifax Herald
No information

Halifax Harold Chronicle
No information

The Chronicle Herald (Halifax)
1875: founded
1907-: owned by Dennis family

Newfoundland

Corner Brook Western Star
1900-1904: founded by Walter S. March, (April, 4)
1904-1924: Star Printing and Publishing Co.
1924-1926: A. L. Barrett
1954: became a daily
1926-1979: Western Printing and Publishing Co.
1979-1996: Thomson Newspapers
1996-2000: Southam/Hollinger
2000-2002: CanWest Global
2002-: GTC Transcontinental
St. John’s Evening Telegram
1879-1970: founded by William James Herder; owned by Herder family
1922: Herder dies; Board of Directors is established with two of his sons on it: W.H
Herder as president and H.A Herder as vice-president
1934-1955: W.H Herder and H.A. Herder die; Ralph B. Herder is named president of the
Board of Directors (died in 1955)
1970: Jim Herder dies (last of the Herder sons)
1970-1996: Thomson
1996-2000: Hollinger
2000-2002: CanWest Global buys Hollinger’s newspapers
2002-: GTC Transcontinental buys the newspaper

St. John’s Daily News
No information

Evening Times Globe
No information

Sunday Post
No information

Last Post
No information

Download this in PDF format(in case McGill removes their copy): CanadianNewsOwnership.pdf Brought to you with the help of Charles Bronfman, co-chair of the Mcgill Institute for the Study of Canada. They won’t tell you that most of the media in Canada is owned by the Zionists, but the facts are above in black and white. http://www.thecharlesbronfmanprize.com/charlesbronfman.php








"The same phenomenon was found in Canada, where the three most prominent business families were all Jewish—the Belzbergs of Vancouver, the Bronfmans of Montreal and the Reichmanns of Toronto."

Source:
Edward S. Shapiro, 1992, "A Time For Healing: American Jewry After World War Two", p. 117





The Bronfmans' Leveraged Leviathan
By CLYDE H. FARNSWORTH
Published: May 24, 1992

Back in 1979 two of Canada's great dynastic business families seemed headed for a sensational confrontation. The Bronfman brothers, Edward and Peter -- they're the "other" Bronfmans, not the Seagram branch of the family -- and the Reichmann brothers, Paul, Albert and Ralph, coveted a real estate holding company called Trizec Corporation. Trizec was the company through which William Zeckendorf, the New York developer, assembled an impressive collection of Canadian properties.

The Bronfmans, intent on building a real estate empire, had taken a 37 percent stake in Trizec three years earlier. Then the Reichmanns, busy building their own empire, came along and snapped up a 35 percent stake. The looming collision over who would control Trizec promised to be as exciting as any plot a potboiler novelist might dream up.

But one day some of the Bronfmans' lieutenants bumped into Paul Reichmann in a hotel lobby. After a 10-minute chat, they discovered that the Reichmanns really only wanted Trizec as an investment. They were perfectly willing to let the Bronfmans continue running it.

Corporate Canada is, if anything, a vast web of interlocking companies owned by a handful of wealthy families -- the Bronfmans, Reichmanns and Belzbergs, for example. Typically, one family group takes stakes in the operations of another and puzzling out who owns what, and where profits and losses do or don't flow from, is akin to peeling away the layers of the proverbial onion.

So it was no surprise that the hotel-lobby conversation 13 years ago led to a partnership deal between the Bronfmans and the Reichmanns, a deal that still stands today. And it also is no surprise that the Edper Group, as the Bronfmans' holdings are called, is now under intense scrutiny because of the bankruptcy filing here 10 days ago by the Reichmanns' Olympia & York Developments Ltd.

The question now asked by investment bankers, stock analysts and executives across Canada is this: Are the Bronfmans next? The answer is as elusive as details of the workings of Edper and the Bronfmans, who, like the Reichmanns, are legendary for their secrecy.

Edper's Long Reach

Edper is about five times larger than Olympia & York and reaches even more deeply into Canada's economic life. There are linkages through not only their joint ownership of some assets, like Trizec, but also the tens of millions of dollars of loans made by Edper companies to Olympia & York. And the two groups do business in some of the same sectors, particularly real estate, which has been rattled deeply by the Reichmanns' troubles.

Edper is a sprawling conglomerate of 500 private companies and 40 public companies with 100,000 employees and assets of $100 billion (Canadian). By some estimates the publicly traded companies account for more than 10 percent of the the Toronto Stock Exchange's capitalization.
Some of the jewels in the Edper crown: Canada's largest concerns in forest products (MacMillan Bloedel), mining (Noranda) and insurance (London Insurance); Canada's second-largest trust company (Royal Trust) and brewer (John Labatt), and such huge real estate operating companies as Trizec, which alone has assets of nearly $12 billion and owns 72 percent of Bramalea Ltd., itself a troubled real estate company with extensive United States holdings.

"I do think we'll come out whole," said Willard J. L'Heureux, 44, a lawyer and key strategist for the group. He runs Hees International Bancorp Inc., Edper's merchant bank. (The Bronfman brothers declined to be interviewed for this article.)


Source:

www.nytimes.com/1992/05/24/business/the-bronfmans-leveraged-leviathan.html




Today, Jews can be numbered among the wealthiest Canadians. They have begun slowly to penetrate those economic sectors that have hitherto been closed to them, at the same time as they are building up wealth in family-owned firms. In these days of global economic networks, the old Anglo-Canadian establishment may no longer be crucial to economic power. Families such as the Bronfmans, the Belzbergs, and the Reichmanns represent just the tip of an extremely affluent segment of Jewish society in Canada. Even as these wealthy Jews and their money begin to be accepted in Gentile high society, they often retain strong loyalties to and status within the Jewish community. Their commitments, typified by gala fund-raising dinners, are routinely chronicled in Jewish-Canadian publications.


Source:
http://www.multiculturalcanada.ca/Encyclopedia/A-Z/j3/4



Vieux stéréotypes


Banquiers et voleurs

Les liens de McCain avec le crime organisé

Les 200 ans au pouvoir des Rothschild

Bronfman et Radio-Cadenas

Le parrain qui soutint Obama

Ces riches qui ne paient pas d'impôt


Seagrams et les organisations juives canadiennes et mondiales

'The New Babylon - Those Who Reign Supreme : A Panoramic Overview of the Historical, Religous and Economic Origins of the New World Order. Inside the Rothschild Empire - The New Pharisees', by Michael Collins Piper (2009)


"The growing numbers of revisionist supporters cannot be ignored. We must use every resource to stop revisionism now, before it's too late."
- Edgar Bronfman

"There is an attempt - and even the word Satanic cannot describe its evilness - to deny that six million Jews, men, women and children, were lead by Nazi Germany and its partners to the pits, the poison spewing trucks, to the gas chambers.."
- Menachem Begin